Armory - Desktop - Windows - Wählen Sie Ihre Wallet - Bitcoin

New to Bitcoin? Confused? Need help? You've come to the right place.

Bitcoin is an internet based decentralised currency. Similarly to Bittorrent, but Bitcoin uses a public ledger called the blockchain to record who has sent and received money. It's very new, and for many very confusing. BitcoinHelp aims to rectify this. Whether it be explaining how it works, how to use it, how to buy Bitcoins, how to integrate Bitcoins into your business. Sharing your successes as well as failures in order to help others is also gladly received. Ask away!
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Moronic Monday: Ask all your bitcoin questions!

You know how it works! But if for some reason you don't, here's how it works:
submitted by cam51037 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Getting frustrated with Ubuntu. Are my experiences the norm for a Linux user?

Let me start off by saying that I'm not a total newb, but still pretty green. I like to believe I'm capable with computers, and know enough to figure out most issues. I also have a pretty solid general understanding of how they function. Been a Windows user most of my life, but decided to make the switch to Linux a few years back.
My experiences thus far are making me reconsider the switch, despite the fact that I've really become opposed to using Windows. I'm curious if I should expect more of the same indefinitely, or if my experiences up to this point are unusual, and I should expect to reach a point where I can just use the OS, instead of spend hours trying to perform every task.
It all started when I downloaded Ubuntu about three years ago. I easily got it installed as a dual boot on a Windows machine. Had to start by allocating disk space in Windows for the new Linux install, prepared a live usb, went through the install, cake. Then I started trying to do stuff, like use a printer. Well HP doesn't make a driver for Linux and, probably, 2-4 hours of research led to me still not having a working printer. I found a driver, but the process to get it installed did not work as it was supposed to. I forget the specifics, but I followed a tutorial to the T, but ran into unforeseen installation issues, and never could figure out how to get the process complete.
After that I started running into issues with the FireFox browser. I've alwasy used FF on Windows with no issues. On Ubuntu it ran slower than dial-up from the mid-90's. Again, 2-4 hours worth of research and several changes to things like FF settings, disabling add-ons, etc., and I still had no fix.
Still I wasn't deterred. Then the dual boot broke. I tried boot repair. No dice. Tried for several hours to get it working. Asked about it on forums, sent in results of boot repair (where I forget) only to get no response, and finally I threw in the towel.
I also struggled to get Bitcoin Armory working, with some very frustrating success, but I didn't count that against Linux, since it was very new software, and I wasn't surprised it was buggy.
Fast forward to today. I've been using Windows for a couple years, with few attempts made to use Linux, except for trying to retrieve a very small amount of BTC from Armory, which consumed about three weekends of my life to finally achieve.
Now I've decided to give it another go. I downloaded UbuntuStudio b/c I'd like to use some of the music production software that comes with it.
Following some tutorials online, I tried to connect my midi keyboard to the computer using QJackCtl. I couldn't remember the issue that I ran into when starting to type this up, so I tried to repeat the process, only to have the program crash during start up, three times. The computer had literally just restarted 20 minutes ago, so I doubt a reboot would work, but maybe. It's almost funny at this point. I'm really disappointed that I can't get the audio software that came with the distro working "fresh out of the box." Maybe with a few hours, or weekends, worth of research?
I've also been getting a system error message every time I login. I posted a query on the Ubuntu forums. That issue has yet to be sorted out.
I hesitate to include this next part, because it involves software that is really still in it's early stages, and I'm trying to be realistic in taking the perspective that any problems I encounter are with the new software, not Ubuntu, but the fact that I had zero problems getting the same stuff to work in Windows just adds to my frustration with Ubuntu.
Everything I'm about to describe is involved with installing monero mining and wallet software. The exception is the AMD drivers needed for the GPU I'm using to mine. Those I expected to work without issue. I followed the directions for installing the AMD drivers for Ubuntu on the AMD website, and the program would not work. After, you guessed it, 2-4 hours of research, I finally, almost by accident, installed an older version of the driver software. Boom, it worked. WTF man?! When I installed the Windows version it took 2 minutes.
Moving on, I tried getting the xmr-stak mining software working. This took me several hours, spread over several days to sort out. Same with the monero-gui wallet, which actually I've only got half-way working. In fact, I've tried installing the monero-gui by two different ways. In the process I've inadvertently got the monerod daemon running, but not the gui. Actually, the monerod daemon starts with the computer and I haven't even started trying to figure out how to turn that off, since what's the point of having it run if I can't use the gui?
In Windows I had all of this up and running in a couple of hours. And in saying that I'm prepared for the "if you like Windows so much then use that!" or "you're just too thick to figure it out!", but I don't like Windows, and I don't think it's a matter of not figuring it out. It seems to me that the reason I've spent dozens of hours just trying to get things to work in Linux is that nearly every time I've tried to do something, there is inevatably some error along the way where following the directions isn't good enough, and sorting out the issue is a feat in and of itself.
I just want to know if this is unusual, or if this is how it's going to go forever if I keep using Linux. Is my experience typical?
TL;DR: I've had a litany of issues and spent countless hours trying to fix them using Linux. Is this rare, and I've just had an unusual experience, or actually pretty common, and I should just accept it as the cost of using an open source OS?
submitted by rtfioeti to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

18 hours and waiting - What did I do wrong?

EDIT Thank you all for you input, it was very helpful! I understand the fee system/mempool/CPFP/RBF/etc. much better now and have since been able to send transactions considerably faster than the 28.5 hours this one took! Really appreciate the help!
TL;DR - Where did I go wrong with this transaction? It's been 18hrs with 0 confirmations despite showing high priority: https://blockchain.info/tx/ba4a236fc95e20fd9328be5911999ce413c41622f5c86e935f9e3aee7e21cfbd
I dabbled with mining bitcoins for fun a couple of years back and then kind of forgot about it. It came up in conversation recently so I decided to use the small amount I made back then try out cloud mining.
After hours of getting everything setup again (using Armory) I placed the order and sent the bitcoins through from my Armory wallet. 18 hours later and the transaction is yet to be confirmed despite showing as high priority. Other similar value, similar fee transactions have been confirmed
I've done a bunch of reading online and it appears that things are more complicated now than they used to be despite nothing really changing. Satoshi's were not a thing when I first started mining, nor do I remember having to be concerned about the bytes/fee ratio.
Anyway, from my reading most issues seem to come from:
I was wondering if because my coins were confirmed so far back in the chain and I've been inactive since that this might be slowing things down?
Just asking for a bit of advice really to understand why it would be taking this long and how to prevent it in future (higher fee?)
submitted by Longsh07 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinDiscussion [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to bitcoinxt [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCluster [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency: Is It Still Alive or Dying? Part 2.

Cryptocurrency: Is It Still Alive or Dying? Part 2.
Part 2. Political and Economic Trends in Favor of the Cryptocurrency Market Development

In the first part of the story we showed that the cryptocurrency market crash in 2018 and the beginning of its recovery in 2019 fit well into the general patterns of the financial bubbles’ development, and also repeat pretty well the Bitcoin dynamics of 2014-2016. But besides the analogies with other bubbles, there are a lot of other arguments in favor of the global growth of the market, among which are the political and economic trends of the recent years.

Relaxation of the Political Climate around the Cryptoassets

The entire year of 2017 has witnessed heated discussions as to the legal status of the digital assets. One of the central events of the year was their legalization in Japan in April. Precisely this legalization, according to many, spurred a dramatic growth of the cryptocurrency market in May (especially, altcoins). But the majority of other countries during this period held more skeptical positions.

The U.S. government on several occasions refused to register bitcoin-ETF - exchange-traded funds, the price of shares in which would repeat the price of BTC. The U.S. government also extremely tightened the conditions of the ICO procedure, while some countries, such as China and South Korea - have banned it completely. Certain countries, such as Indonesia and Salvador, have banned cryptocurrencies to the extent of criminal responsibility.

A number of countries, including Russia, have adopted a cautious wait-and-see attitude, regularly promising to impose restrictions of varying severity, but not hurrying to sign it into law.

A turning point on the way to the global recognition of the cryptocurrency was the beginning of trading the Bitcoin futures at the Chicago exchanges (CME) (the world’s largest stock exchange in terms of turnover) and CBOE in December of 2017. That is when the American government admitted openly that cryptocurrencies are now to be reckoned with. With the beginning of this trade, the powerful financial circles of the USA, whose opinion cannot be ignored by the political leadership, became interested in the development of the cryptocurrency market.

Chicago Mercantile Exchange, CME – the world leader in terms of trade volume

In 2018, the following paradox became obvious: even if over the longer term cryptocurrencies are dangerous for the modern political system (tied up in the central banks and the currency exchange regulation), the countries that will be the first to prohibit them will be most affected along with those countries that will simply overdo stirring up negative attitude. Those countries that will settle on legalization will benefit. The drain of brains and capitals will be directed to these countries from the more repressive or unpredictable countries. A typical example of that - Crypto Project GRAM of the Russian businessman Pavel Durov, whose ICO in 2018 reached a record amount, but it was carried out in USA, and not in the legislatively uncertain Russian Federation.

The experience of the countries that have legalized the cryptocurrencies, proved successful both from the financial standpoint, and from the perspective of the international prestige. They proved themselves to be open to the progress and new freedoms. In addition to Japan, Switzerland is especially noteworthy here, because it legalized cryptocurrencies as early as in 2016, but the most brilliantly announced about itself in 2018, when its banks began to introduce cryptocurrency services one after another. Among the innovator banks there was even a Swiss subsidiary of the Russian Savings Bank (Sberbank). The very expression “Swiss bank” became a synonym of not only high reliability, but also innovation.
A milestone event of 2018 was legalization of cryptocurrencies in Germany – the leading economy of the European Union. Rather liberal measures relative to the cryptocurrencies are being applied today in Czechia, Sweden, Canada, Denmark, Australia, Estonia, Norway, Finland, and a number of other countries.

“Legalization parade” has shown: the politicians with repressive attitudes cannot count on the global ban of the cryptocurrencies (which seemed theoretically possible in 2016-2017). Economically developed countries made an obvious choice: “if you cannot stop the process – become its leader”. And precisely in these countries the maximum capitals are being circulated, and the market situation depends precisely on their business activity.

Explosive Growth of the Retail Use of Cryptocurrencies
Despite obvious popularization of cryptocurrencies, there is still a myth that they are purely investment and speculative instrument, which, even if used as a payment method – only in the dark net, and as a means of payment for illegal commodities. But this is not the case today. As far back as 2013-2015, legal services accepting bitcoin emerged, and in 2016-2018 their market has undergone explosive growth.

The pioneers of the cryptocurrency market of goods and services in 2013, were, for example, Virgin Galactic – space tourism company, Victoria’s Secret lingerie company, Shopify - a supplier of software for the online stores. In 2014, the cryptocurrency was adopted by the Overstock online store, Expedia tourism service, Zynga – operator of the online games, the software monster Microsoft and many others. Some of these companies considerably went up due to the innovations: for example, the shares of Shopify and Overstock have increased in price several-fold since then.

As of today, the cryptocurrency is accepted by hundreds of large companies and thousands of small ones, while the range of their products is approaching the one in a traditional economy. The most popular categories of the goods for the cryptocurrency in the large famous companies are tourism and air tickets (Expedia), software and games (Microsoft, Shopify, Zynga, Steam), clothing and other consumer goods (Victoria’s Secret, Overstock.com, Rakuten), as well as food products (Subway, KFC, Burger King – in Russia). As an example, Playboy erotic products, premium accounts of the 4chan.org and reddit.com forums, Bloomberg.com business news, automobiles in the Czech show room Alza and many other goods can be also purchased for cryptocurrency.

A number of well-known companies, although they prefer traditional payments, nevertheless allow crypto payments through the intermediary services, such as gyft.com (trading with the card Gyft for BTC). For example, Ebay online store, Wallmart supermarket chain, Starbucks restaurants, Uber taxi service, etc. The turnover of gyft.com is evaluated in the amount of 25 million dollars with only 38 employees.
Small start-up companies often use ready-made multicurrency gateways such as coinpayments.net. It supports dozens of currencies, and hosts about 400 companies. In addition to mainstream, it contains a lot of specialized commodities. For example, crypto-armory.com sells cartridges, francvila.com – Swiss watches, directvoltage.com - 3D-printers, electric motors, CNC machines, etc. Some new stores not only accept cryptocurrencies, but also purposely give up fiat currency. For example, crypto-armory.com, explaining their refusal from fiat currency, state both ideological, and narrow pragmatic reasons. In the opinion of the owners of the store, it is easier to accept cryptocurrency payments both technically and legally.

Cartridges from the cryptocurrency store crypto-armory.com
An important trend of 2017-2018, in addition to the general growth of the commodity market - re-orientation of the stores to the multi-currency payments. Whereas previously most of them accepted only BTC, now a sign of good manners is to accept also LTC, ETH, XMR and at least several more currencies.

Thus, while the politicians were solving the problem in the manner “not possible to allow - disallow”, a vast market of commodities for cryptocurrency spontaneously emerged on the Internet. Some of its participants have multibillion capitalizations. This market is very international. The majority of commodities and services can be bought even from Russia and other countries, where cryptocurrency is not legal as an internal payment instrument, but is not prohibited as such. Today, it is hard to imagine a consumer good, which cannot be bought for cryptocurrency.

The Latest Trend – Support of Cryptocurrencies by Smartphones

The first smartphone with a cryptocurrency wallet was HYPERLINK "https://bitcryptonews.ru/blogs/sravnenie-blokchejn-smartfonov-exodus-1-i-finney"HTC Exodus 1, released in the autumn of 2018. Then, a crypto smartphone HYPERLINK emerged "https://bitcryptonews.ru/blogs/obzor-kriptosmartfona-finney"Finney. And in March of 2019, the baton was unexpectedly picked up by the smartphone from the major South Korean company, Samsung - Galaxy S10. And although Samsung refrained from the direct embedding of the cryptocurrency wallet into the standard supply set, a brand wallet of Samsung can be installed from the Galaxy Store.

Galaxy S10 – the first smartphone from Samsung with cryptocurrency support

On the part of crypto enthusiasts, there are a number of claims to Samsung initiative, among which – the lack of bitcoin support (BTC). At the moment, Samsung Blockchain Wallet supports only Ethereum (ETH) and ERC-20 standard currencies and tokens created on its basis:
Basic Attention Token (BAT), Chainlink (LINK), BinanceCoin (BNB), True USD (TUSD), USD Coin (USDC), Paxos Standard (PAX) and others.

Anyway, from a political and PR perspective, the emergence of Galaxy S10 is a great event.

First of all, smartphone can attract to the cryptocurrency market new people who have greater confidence in the famous brand, than in the traditional bulky cryptocurrency wallets. Now, many people are frightened away from the cryptocurrencies only by technical difficulties, whereas smartphones on many occasions have proved their ability to promote to the masses those things, which previously seemed to be very complex.
Secondly, this step of Samsung is a clear signal both to the domestic and foreign governments: big business is on the side of the new technologies. South Korea has a reputation of a country not very friendly to cryptocurrencies, however, its business giant publicly demonstrated another attitude.
Thirdly, the initiative of Samsung with a high degree of probability will be emulated by other leading producers of communication devices. Thus, shortly after the release of Galaxy S10, there appeared a news that a cryptocurrency wallet will soon be available in iOS Opera Touch, which means that cryptocurrencies can be also stored in iPhone of Apple.
All this creates excellent prerequisites both for the world legalization of the cryptocurrencies, and for the growth of the market due to the increase of the number of users.

Conclusion
Thus, despite the “roller coaster” of the cryptocurrency exchange rates, some fundamental processes have developed steadily in the same direction in the recent years: expansion of the commodity market for cryptocurrency, increase in the number of countries with a liberal attitude to cryptocurrencies, adoption of cryptocurrencies as a strategic technology by more and more industrial giants. The total number of individuals who tried to work with the cryptocurrencies grows steadily, while the new technological trends (in particular, crypto smartphones), can additionally accelerate this growth.

The only thing that can seriously damage a cryptocurrency market is its global ban, but it seems to be unlikely. Right now there are about 40 million bitcoin wallets on earth. It is believed that on average their number is doubled annually, which means that within 5 years it can reach a billion. And if now a global ban on cryptocurrencies is unrealistic due to their profitability for the developed countries, by that time their prohibition will become impossible almost physically.

In the first part of the story we had put forward the arguments as to why the investors need not fear the bubble of 2017-2018: in the end, the bubble showed not so much the riskiness of the crypto investments, but rather their long-term prospects. Today we described political and economic events, which have occurred in parallel “behind the scenes”, and in which there were no “drops” – only progressive development toward the construction of the crypto economy. And in the next, third part, we will try to describe in detail specific financial reasons of the collapse and recovery of the market in 2018-2019.

Analytical department, Trident company, Victor Argonov, Candidate of Physical and Mathematical Sciences.
Source:http://trident-germes.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Germes.mining.robot/
submitted by TridentGermes to u/TridentGermes [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [email protected].
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency: Is It Still Alive or Dying? Part 2

Cryptocurrency: Is It Still Alive or Dying? Part 2
Cryptocurrency: Is It Still Alive or Dying?
Part 2. Political and Economic Trends in Favor of the Cryptocurrency Market Development

In the first part of the story we showed that the cryptocurrency market crash in 2018 and the beginning of its recovery in 2019 fit well into the general patterns of the financial bubbles’ development, and also repeat pretty well the Bitcoin dynamics of 2014-2016. But besides the analogies with other bubbles, there are a lot of other arguments in favor of the global growth of the market, among which are the political and economic trends of the recent years.

Relaxation of the Political Climate around the Cryptoassets

The entire year of 2017 has witnessed heated discussions as to the legal status of the digital assets. One of the central events of the year was their legalization in Japan in April. Precisely this legalization, according to many, spurred a dramatic growth of the cryptocurrency market in May (especially, altcoins). But the majority of other countries during this period held more skeptical positions.

The U.S. government on several occasions refused to register bitcoin-ETF - exchange-traded funds, the price of shares in which would repeat the price of BTC. The U.S. government also extremely tightened the conditions of the ICO procedure, while some countries, such as China and South Korea - have banned it completely. Certain countries, such as Indonesia and Salvador, have banned cryptocurrencies to the extent of criminal responsibility.

A number of countries, including Russia, have adopted a cautious wait-and-see attitude, regularly promising to impose restrictions of varying severity, but not hurrying to sign it into law.

A turning point on the way to the global recognition of the cryptocurrency was the beginning of trading the Bitcoin futures at the Chicago exchanges (CME) (the world’s largest stock exchange in terms of turnover) and CBOE in December of 2017. That is when the American government admitted openly that cryptocurrencies are now to be reckoned with. With the beginning of this trade, the powerful financial circles of the USA, whose opinion cannot be ignored by the political leadership, became interested in the development of the cryptocurrency market.
Chicago Mercantile Exchange, CME – the world leader in terms of trade volume

In 2018, the following paradox became obvious: even if over the longer term cryptocurrencies are dangerous for the modern political system (tied up in the central banks and the currency exchange regulation), the countries that will be the first to prohibit them will be most affected along with those countries that will simply overdo stirring up negative attitude. Those countries that will settle on legalization will benefit. The drain of brains and capitals will be directed to these countries from the more repressive or unpredictable countries. A typical example of that - Crypto Project GRAM of the Russian businessman Pavel Durov, whose ICO in 2018 reached a record amount, but it was carried out in USA, and not in the legislatively uncertain Russian Federation.

The experience of the countries that have legalized the cryptocurrencies, proved successful both from the financial standpoint, and from the perspective of the international prestige. They proved themselves to be open to the progress and new freedoms. In addition to Japan, Switzerland is especially noteworthy here, because it legalized cryptocurrencies as early as in 2016, but the most brilliantly announced about itself in 2018, when its banks began to introduce cryptocurrency services one after another. Among the innovator banks there was even a Swiss subsidiary of the Russian Savings Bank (Sberbank). The very expression “Swiss bank” became a synonym of not only high reliability, but also innovation.

A milestone event of 2018 was legalization of cryptocurrencies in Germany – the leading economy of the European Union. Rather liberal measures relative to the cryptocurrencies are being applied today in Czechia, Sweden, Canada, Denmark, Australia, Estonia, Norway, Finland, and a number of other countries.

“Legalization parade” has shown: the politicians with repressive attitudes cannot count on the global ban of the cryptocurrencies (which seemed theoretically possible in 2016-2017). Economically developed countries made an obvious choice: “if you cannot stop the process – become its leader”. And precisely in these countries the maximum capitals are being circulated, and the market situation depends precisely on their business activity.

Explosive Growth of the Retail Use of Cryptocurrencies

Despite obvious popularization of cryptocurrencies, there is still a myth that they are purely investment and speculative instrument, which, even if used as a payment method – only in the dark net, and as a means of payment for illegal commodities. But this is not the case today. As far back as 2013-2015, legal services accepting bitcoin emerged, and in 2016-2018 their market has undergone explosive growth.

The pioneers of the cryptocurrency market of goods and services in 2013, were, for example, Virgin Galactic – space tourism company, Victoria’s Secret lingerie company, Shopify - a supplier of software for the online stores. In 2014, the cryptocurrency was adopted by the Overstock online store, Expedia tourism service, Zynga – operator of the online games, the software monster Microsoft and many others. Some of these companies considerably went up due to the innovations: for example, the shares of Shopify and Overstock have increased in price several-fold since then.

As of today, the cryptocurrency is accepted by hundreds of large companies and thousands of small ones, while the range of their products is approaching the one in a traditional economy. The most popular categories of the goods for the cryptocurrency in the large famous companies are tourism and air tickets (Expedia), software and games (Microsoft, Shopify, Zynga, Steam), clothing and other consumer goods (Victoria’s Secret, Overstock.com, Rakuten), as well as food products (Subway, KFC, Burger King – in Russia). As an example, Playboy erotic products, premium accounts of the 4chan.org and reddit.com forums, Bloomberg.com business news, automobiles in the Czech show room Alza and many other goods can be also purchased for cryptocurrency.

A number of well-known companies, although they prefer traditional payments, nevertheless allow crypto payments through the intermediary services, such as gyft.com (trading with the card Gyft for BTC). For example, Ebay online store, Wallmart supermarket chain, Starbucks restaurants, Uber taxi service, etc. The turnover of gyft.com is evaluated in the amount of 25 million dollars with only 38 employees.
Small start-up companies often use ready-made multicurrency gateways such as coinpayments.net. It supports dozens of currencies, and hosts about 400 companies. In addition to mainstream, it contains a lot of specialized commodities. For example, crypto-armory.com sells cartridges, francvila.com – Swiss watches, directvoltage.com - 3D-printers, electric motors, CNC machines, etc. Some new stores not only accept cryptocurrencies, but also purposely give up fiat currency. For example, crypto-armory.com, explaining their refusal from fiat currency, state both ideological, and narrow pragmatic reasons. In the opinion of the owners of the store, it is easier to accept cryptocurrency payments both technically and legally.

Cartridges from the cryptocurrency store crypto-armory.com
An important trend of 2017-2018, in addition to the general growth of the commodity market - re-orientation of the stores to the multi-currency payments. Whereas previously most of them accepted only BTC, now a sign of good manners is to accept also LTC, ETH, XMR and at least several more currencies.

Thus, while the politicians were solving the problem in the manner “not possible to allow - disallow”, a vast market of commodities for cryptocurrency spontaneously emerged on the Internet. Some of its participants have multibillion capitalizations. This market is very international. The majority of commodities and services can be bought even from Russia and other countries, where cryptocurrency is not legal as an internal payment instrument, but is not prohibited as such. Today, it is hard to imagine a consumer good, which cannot be bought for cryptocurrency.

The Latest Trend – Support of Cryptocurrencies by Smartphones

The first smartphone with a cryptocurrency wallet was HYPERLINK "https://bitcryptonews.ru/blogs/sravnenie-blokchejn-smartfonov-exodus-1-i-finney"HTC Exodus 1, released in the autumn of 2018. Then, a crypto smartphone HYPERLINK emerged "https://bitcryptonews.ru/blogs/obzor-kriptosmartfona-finney"Finney. And in March of 2019, the baton was unexpectedly picked up by the smartphone from the major South Korean company, Samsung - Galaxy S10. And although Samsung refrained from the direct embedding of the cryptocurrency wallet into the standard supply set, a brand wallet of Samsung can be installed from the Galaxy Store.

https://preview.redd.it/p8zc6dat0ay21.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d7f173f7470107c2f4cc5868ed882089499b2a09
Galaxy S10 – the first smartphone from Samsung with cryptocurrency support
On the part of crypto enthusiasts, there are a number of claims to Samsung initiative, among which – the lack of bitcoin support (BTC). At the moment, Samsung Blockchain Wallet supports only Ethereum (ETH) and ERC-20 standard currencies and tokens created on its basis:
Basic Attention Token (BAT), Chainlink (LINK), BinanceCoin (BNB), True USD (TUSD), USD Coin (USDC), Paxos Standard (PAX) and others.

Anyway, from a political and PR perspective, the emergence of Galaxy S10 is a great event.

First of all, smartphone can attract to the cryptocurrency market new people who have greater confidence in the famous brand, than in the traditional bulky cryptocurrency wallets. Now, many people are frightened away from the cryptocurrencies only by technical difficulties, whereas smartphones on many occasions have proved their ability to promote to the masses those things, which previously seemed to be very complex.

Secondly, this step of Samsung is a clear signal both to the domestic and foreign governments: big business is on the side of the new technologies. South Korea has a reputation of a country not very friendly to cryptocurrencies, however, its business giant publicly demonstrated another attitude.

Thirdly, the initiative of Samsung with a high degree of probability will be emulated by other leading producers of communication devices. Thus, shortly after the release of Galaxy S10, there appeared a news that a cryptocurrency wallet will soon be available in iOS Opera Touch, which means that cryptocurrencies can be also stored in iPhone of Apple.

All this creates excellent prerequisites both for the world legalization of the cryptocurrencies, and for the growth of the market due to the increase of the number of users.

Conclusion

Thus, despite the “roller coaster” of the cryptocurrency exchange rates, some fundamental processes have developed steadily in the same direction in the recent years: expansion of the commodity market for cryptocurrency, increase in the number of countries with a liberal attitude to cryptocurrencies, adoption of cryptocurrencies as a strategic technology by more and more industrial giants. The total number of individuals who tried to work with the cryptocurrencies grows steadily, while the new technological trends (in particular, crypto smartphones), can additionally accelerate this growth.

The only thing that can seriously damage a cryptocurrency market is its global ban, but it seems to be unlikely. Right now there are about 40 million bitcoin wallets on earth. It is believed that on average their number is doubled annually, which means that within 5 years it can reach a billion. And if now a global ban on cryptocurrencies is unrealistic due to their profitability for the developed countries, by that time their prohibition will become impossible almost physically.

In the first part of the story we had put forward the arguments as to why the investors need not fear the bubble of 2017-2018: in the end, the bubble showed not so much the riskiness of the crypto investments, but rather their long-term prospects. Today we described political and economic events, which have occurred in parallel “behind the scenes”, and in which there were no “drops” – only progressive development toward the construction of the crypto economy. And in the next, third part, we will try to describe in detail specific financial reasons of the collapse and recovery of the market in 2018-2019.

Analytical department, Trident company, Victor Argonov, Candidate of Physical and Mathematical Sciences.
Source:http://trident-germes.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Germes.mining.robot/
submitted by TridentGermes to ENG [link] [comments]

I'm writing a Bitcoin story for national television broadcast and online distribution that millions will see. What do you want it to say?

Disclaimer: I've owned Bitcoins since 2011 and am very active in /Bitcoin, but use a different alias. This is my "real name" Reddit account matching my Twitter account: @danls.
I'm also Vice President of Money Talks News. The company started more than 22 years ago as a consumer finance television news segment, and grew to 85 broadcast markets, more than 3 million viewers, and won 2 Emmys.
8 years ago, I joined the company and we started a web site. That site now does more than 1 million unique visitors per month, and our content is syndicated to MSN, Yahoo, AOL, Comcast, and a few others.
For example, this URL is just 15 pages of our videos: http://www.bing.com/videos/browse/money/finance
Bitcoins have grown in popularity to the point where they're now becoming a mainstream topic of conversation, and we're about to introduce our viewers and readers to them.
We'd like to put out a "Bitcoin for Dummies" television story and matching written piece, though without the potentially trademark infringing title.
Rather than write the story, publish it, and see it bashed to hell in this subreddit for being too anti-Bitcoin or too pro-Bitcoin or not-enough-about-Bitcoin, I'd rather give everyone here an opportunity to provide input before the story is finished.
So what do you want to see included in a Bitcoin story?
Right now, I'm planning to tell our audience to only buy through Coinbase, and never keep more in that account that you would in the wallet you walk around with. Anything over that amount is safest on an encrypted paper wallet stored in a bank vault (which I'm going to try and explain how to setup as simply as possible).
But do you think I should talk about 2-of-3 private keys? Armory/Electrum Online/Offline wallets? How important do you think understanding the block chain is to a new Bitcoiner? Think it's worth talking about mining when it's essentially unprofitable to all but the most hooked-up miners? How much explanation should be spent on Altcoins? Or is there some other aspect of Bitcoin you've always wanted to see detailed in the media? This is your chance to speak up.
Just so everyone is aware, I'm capable of writing this story without input. I'm not asking for help understanding Bitcoin. Rather, this is an opportunity for you to take part in shaping a Bitcoin story that millions will see, written by an early adopter. So don't be a troll.
submitted by danls to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Found my first bitcoin address from 2011. Now what?

After hearing the more online merchants are accepting Bitcoin, I started trying to learn more about it yesterday. I remembered that in 2011, I actually tried mining and I eventually got .05 BTC. I emailed myself my bitcoin address back then.
Now here is what I don't understand. If I were to attempt to get the BTC from my old bitcoin address into my wallet on blockchain or my wallet on coinbase, what would I need? Would I need a private key, a password -- both?
This isn't a huge deal and if I can't get the coins it isn't an issue at all, but I'm confused -- and I don't like that. :)
UPDATE: Thank you all for your help. I found the wallet.dat file and have it loaded in Bitcoin-QT. The wallet did contain the 0.05 BTC. I'll now install Armory and use that as my wallet and utilize the paper wallet feature and stick that puppy in my safe. :)
submitted by DetachableMonkey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Asking questions

So I've decided to join the illustrious pursuit of Bitcoin mining. I've done a bit of research on the matter, and read over a few of the posts here. And I still have a lot of research to do yet. My first problem is that there's still a lot that I'm not sure about and I'm still new enough that I don't quite know the right questions to ask, or if the questions I'm trying to ask are even applicable. So, I wanted to outline my situation and some of my thoughts here and see if this great community could help direct my research.
To start off, I purchased my ASIC hardware today, and I'm awaiting delivery. I managed to get a total of 13.2GH/s for less than $300, which seemed like a good buy. It's more MH/s per $ than the $350 USB device that butterfly labs was offering. I know that's pretty weak, but it's where I've decided to start. It's good enough for getting my feet wet.
My first real question is regarding the network bandwidth requirements of an active mining setup. All of the online guides I have read have said absolutely nothing to this issue. Common sense would tell me that this is either a negligible concern or in some other way, so bluntly obvious that it doesn't bear mentioning. So at the risk of sounding dense, can anybody describe their situation in this area? I've got a 12Mb/s DSL connection, will that be a bottleneck issue or will it suffice?
As I've come to understand, my next steps are to setup a wallet for the currency, join a user pool and setup a mining client. And it's these steps where my questions begin.
The most popular choice among the webz for walltes was easily Bitcoin Armory, but the 6GB RAM requirement is a nonstarter for my current hardware setup. I understand that they are working to reduce that requirement and that, also, there are hardware wallet modules hitting the market soon. Until one of the two options becomes available, I'm looking at utilizing a third party, web based wallet. Any suggestions in that regard would be appreciated. But my first concern with a wallet is that I am very interested in mining cryptocurrencies other than Bitcoin. I haven't been able to get an answer as to whether or not I will need an individual wallet for each unique currency I mine or if wallets generally support more than one currency type.
Reading through a number of the beginner's guides found through google gave me the impression that installing a mining client and joining a mining pool were separate issues. But a thread I read here seemed to indicate that particular clients were tied to specific mining pools. Preferably, I'd prefer a client that would allow me to select a mining pool, as well as supporting mining for Bitcoin as well as multiple other cryptocurrencies. Is that a realistic expectation?
If the tone of any of my questions suggest any broad misconceptions, I would appreciate a heads up. If anybody can link to some helpful literature on the subject, that would also be appreciated.
Thanks for reading, and cheers for any help.
submitted by playedspades to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

So I bought my first bitcoin in Vancouver with the ATM

It was an interesting experience. There were a couple guys from Bitcoiniacs there that were helping anyone who was confused with their first time.
The guys where talking about changes to the UI to make it easier to use and understand. They were talking about some older customers and what they had difficulty seeing and using.
For a first time user I was required to scan my palm 6 times to set myself with the system. I then had the option of including an email to attach to my palm account to get info, which I did. I then got an email saying my account was ready.
I then started a transaction. I entered that I wanted a little over 1 bitcoin. I was able to use my phone to bring up my QR code and have it scanned by the ATM. It then asked me to put in the cash, and the amount I put in was what it put into my account.
To tell you the truth I was a little unclear if the amount I entered at first was just to let me see the trade value of bitcoin at that amount, and if I was then able to adjust the amount I wanted to purchase by putting in the amount of cash that I wanted.
There was lag with their servers or something they were saying, so it took some time for my bitcoin to get into my account. I must admit this made me feel a little funny as a first time bitcoin user. They said it shouldn't take that long anymore, but mine did take 7 hours to arrive in my account. Hopefully that will no longer be an issue.
Well that was my experience buying bitcoin for the first time. Now I just need to figure out a second wallet that is more safe than my phone for storing, and keep my phone wallet for transactions. I tried Armory, but my computer can not seem to handle it. I am likely going to create an online wallet at blockchain.info until I find something better to transfer to again.
submitted by SILENTSAM69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Experiment: Earning My First Bitcoin

This is my story on how I earned my first Bitcoin, and what I learned along the way. In December of 2013 I downloaded Bitcoin-QT after hearing about the meteoric rise of Bitcoin. At the time the price was in correction from the all time high of 1163 and was at 651. I had missed the train. At this time I started to visit Bitcoin more. I didn’t understand a thing I was reading. It’s like I stumbled across another language, with so many references to concepts that were completely foreign to me. I am by no means a computer expert. My competence level is average.
The highly technical language used in this sub and in the Bitcoin spaces is a barrier of entry to non-tech savvy individuals. But it is also an attraction for people who have a thirst for knowledge. And once you understand the technical side of Bitcoin it becomes more attractive. By its very nature Bitcoin is a self sustaining unit of account that is incorruptibly honest. Reading those words is entirely different from understanding what they mean. And once you do understand what they mean, what Bitcoin means, Attraction Amplified. So after lurking for a while and learning the basics, I came to this simple conclusion. I wanted it. But I honestly couldn't justify out right buying it.
So I set myself a goal. I’ll try earning just .1 bitcoin. Looking back, this took me way too long because I sticked with the faucets and paytoclick sites for way too long. But once I got go my first .1 BTC in February of 2015 I set myself a new goal. To earn one Bitcoin. My first Bitcoin wasn’t going to be mined or bought, but Earned. And 5 months latter I achieved that goal. By doing this I learned so much about the Bitcoin ecosystem.
Chart of earnings over time. Blue is earnings per day. Red is total earnings over time.
http://i.imgur.com/Y6cgH5z.png
The first thing I learned was that faucets are a huge waste of time for earning Bitcoin. But they’re nice to begin with just to get a feel for the mechanics of transactions.
The second thing I learned was that I could earn on average around 1500bits per day using Bitcoinget to do small online tasks, like visiting sites or doing short surveys. But, I have a love hate relationship with Bitcoinget. On the one hand, I’ve earned a good amount with them. But on the other hand, their jobs suck balls. The majority of the tasks on their site are not worth the time to complete, and many don’t work properly. The key is to know which tasks are worth doing and which are not. One in ten tasks on Bitcoinget are worth doing, and that’s being generous. But by using Bitcoinget I was able secure a steady supply of Bitcoin. Shameless Referral link if anyone feels like signing up: http://www.bitcoinget.com/?r=1MienR4vFattHj6XSZjKjDiwDqgxGeq67n
Chart for how much Bitcoinget and the other earning methods contributed as a percent to the 1 BTC goal. http://i.imgur.com/4qj2S82.png
The third method I learned for earning Bitcoin was giveaways. Changetip and sign up bonuses from sites like circle were very lucrative for the time spent on singing up. Just by visiting Bitcoin regularly you can get a fair amount of Bitcoin through giveaways.
The fourth method for earning BTC, and the most profitable, was using Jobs4bitcoins. My first job I took for this method was video editing for some kind of school project/feminist propaganda. The second job I took from Jobs4bitcoins was a excel research project, finding the smart phone penetration rates throughout Africa. This last job tipped me over the edge of .95BTC to 1.25BTC. Both jobs paid quite fairly for the task involved. Protip: never submit work before receiving payment first/use an escrow service.
Jobs4Bitcoin is hands down going to grow into something more. There is huge potential for people around the world to connect with someone else with the skills they need for quick work. Bitcoin enables this seamlessly and empowers individuals to pick and choose their work for themselves. So, shameless plus #2, if you need someone who is good at excel/researching literature/synthesizing large amounts of data, I’m your guy. Video editing too!
Along the way I’ve learned the Bitcoin lingo, set up multiple wallets using Armory, Electrum and Mycelium. I discovered the wonderful world of multi-sig addresses, and the benefits they offer for security. I’ve also learned how to store the backups for these in exotic offline devices like calculators and digital cameras. I’ve even attended a Bitcoin ATM release event, Cool stuff.
Conclusion: Bitcoin is simply amazing and amazingly simple in its simplicity. Overall it’s been a fun experiment, and I’m glad I did it, but this is definitely not a method for everyone. Buying from an exchange or ATM is much faster to acquire BTC. This is why I’ve joined an exchange and plan on buying some more BTC.
My new goal is 2.1 BTC, but I don’t think I’ll be satisfied until that coveted 21 BTC mark. 1 in 10 million here I come, 1 in a million one day soon. Maybe one day when we’re all grey and weary with the years of Bitcoin reaching planet after planet past the moon, I’ll tell my great-great-great-grandchildren that I earned my first Bitcoin. And they’ll either ask me, “what’s a Bight-coin?” or stare at me in silent wonder. I don't know where Bitcoin is going. But I do know that I want it. Other people want it. And there's only ever going to be 21 million.
I had fun writing this post and I hope you enjoyed reading it. Here's to drinking the moon-aid.
submitted by Fiach_Dubh to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Story: How I Earned My First Bitcoin

Re-posting this because it's a good story :P
This is my story on how I earned my first Bitcoin, and what I learned along the way. In December of 2013 I downloaded Bitcoin-QT after hearing about the meteoric rise of Bitcoin. At the time the price was in correction from the all time high of 1163 and was at 651. I had missed the train. At this time I started to visit Bitcoin more. I didn’t understand a thing I was reading. It’s like I stumbled across another language, with so many references to concepts that were completely foreign to me. I am by no means a computer expert. My competence level is average.
The highly technical language used in this sub and in the Bitcoin spaces is a barrier of entry to non-tech savvy individuals. But it is also an attraction for people who have a thirst for knowledge. And once you understand the technical side of Bitcoin it becomes more attractive. By its very nature Bitcoin is a self sustaining unit of account that is incorruptibly honest. Reading those words is entirely different from understanding what they mean. And once you do understand what they mean, what Bitcoin means, Attraction Amplified. So after lurking for a while and learning the basics, I came to this simple conclusion. I wanted it. But I honestly couldn't justify out right buying it.
So I set myself a goal. I’ll try earning just .1 bitcoin. Looking back, this took me way too long because I sticked with the faucets and paytoclick sites for way too long. But once I got go my first .1 BTC in February of 2015 I set myself a new goal. To earn one Bitcoin. My first Bitcoin wasn’t going to be mined or bought, but Earned. And 5 months latter I achieved that goal. By doing this I learned so much about the Bitcoin ecosystem.
Chart of earnings over time. Blue is earnings per day. Red is total earnings over time.
http://i.imgur.com/Y6cgH5z.png
The first thing I learned was that faucets are a huge waste of time for earning Bitcoin. But they’re nice to begin with just to get a feel for the mechanics of transactions.
The second thing I learned was that I could earn on average around 1500bits per day using Bitcoinget to do small online tasks, like visiting sites or doing short surveys. But, I have a love hate relationship with Bitcoinget. On the one hand, I’ve earned a good amount with them. But on the other hand, their jobs suck balls. The majority of the tasks on their site are not worth the time to complete, and many don’t work properly. The key is to know which tasks are worth doing and which are not. One in ten tasks on Bitcoinget are worth doing, and that’s being generous. But by using Bitcoinget I was able secure a steady supply of Bitcoin. Shameless Referral link if anyone feels like signing up: http://www.bitcoinget.com/?r=1MienR4vFattHj6XSZjKjDiwDqgxGeq67n
Chart for how much Bitcoinget and the other earning methods contributed as a percent to the 1 BTC goal. http://i.imgur.com/4qj2S82.png
The third method I learned for earning Bitcoin was giveaways. Changetip and sign up bonuses from sites like circle were very lucrative for the time spent on singing up. Just by visiting Bitcoin regularly you can get a fair amount of Bitcoin through giveaways.
The fourth method for earning BTC, and the most profitable, was using Jobs4bitcoins. My first job I took for this method was video editing for some kind of school project/feminist propaganda. The second job I took from Jobs4bitcoins was a excel research project, finding the smart phone penetration rates throughout Africa. This last job tipped me over the edge of .95BTC to 1.25BTC. Both jobs paid quite fairly for the task involved. Protip: never submit work before receiving payment first/use an escrow service.
Jobs4Bitcoin is hands down going to grow into something more. There is huge potential for people around the world to connect with someone else with the skills they need for quick work. Bitcoin enables this seamlessly and empowers individuals to pick and choose their work for themselves. So, shameless plus #2, if you need someone who is good at excel/researching literature/synthesizing large amounts of data, I’m your guy. Video editing too!
Along the way I’ve learned the Bitcoin lingo, set up multiple wallets using Armory, Electrum and Mycelium. I discovered the wonderful world of multi-sig addresses, and the benefits they offer for security. I’ve also learned how to store the backups for these in exotic offline devices like calculators and digital cameras. I’ve even attended a Bitcoin ATM release event, Cool stuff.
Conclusion: Bitcoin is simply amazing and amazingly simple in its simplicity. Overall it’s been a fun experiment, and I’m glad I did it, but this is definitely not a method for everyone. Buying from an exchange or ATM is much faster to acquire BTC. This is why I’ve joined an exchange and plan on buying some more BTC.
My new goal is 2.1 BTC, but I don’t think I’ll be satisfied until that coveted 21 BTC mark. 1 in 10 million here I come, 1 in a million one day soon. Maybe one day when we’re all grey and weary with the years of Bitcoin reaching planet after planet past the moon, I’ll tell my great-great-great-grandchildren that I earned my first Bitcoin. And they’ll either ask me, “what’s a Bight-coin?” or stare at me in silent wonder. I don't know where Bitcoin is going. But I do know that I want it. Other people want it. And there's only ever going to be 21 million.
I had fun writing this post and I hope you enjoyed reading it. Here's to drinking the moon-aid.
Update: In the 1 and 5 million club as of today :)
submitted by Fiach_Dubh to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Should Bitcoin target a "split" node/wallet architecture? i.e. (1) An online full-node in a remote datacenter, with DDoS protection, high bandwidth, and 24/7 availability... and (2) An offline wallet locally (in my home), with just my private keys - used for signing, like with cold storage or SPV.

I remember over a decade ago when some hobbyists still managed to run webservers (for websites) from their homes. (I believe this involved working around DHCP in order to get a "static" IP address.)
Nowadays of course, almost nobody runs a webserver (for websites) from their homes. They spin up a VPS someplace like Amazon EC2, DigitalOcean, etc.
However, there seems to be this massive "phobia" against running Bitcoin full-nodes in datacenters.
But on the other hand, we have already heard many people saying that:
In addition, there is the concept of "SPV" wallets (simplified payment verification), where a user holds their private keys locally but checks the corresponding (public) addresses online (not on their own local machine) to see their balances.
Similarly, cold-storage or an "air-gapped system" (such as the approach used with Armory, or other wallets which implement BIP 32) (both of which require HD - hierarchical deterministic wallets - in order to keep the online wallet and the offline wallet in-sync) are in some sense similar to SPV wallets - in that the private keys are kept on one (permanently offline) machine, while the (public) addresses are kept on another (online) machine (at the user's location in the case of Armory and other "cold storage" or "air gapped" solutions - or on a remote server in the case of SPV).
OK, so summarizing, this is the background:
  • online nodes need 3 things (DDoS protection, high bandwidth, 24/7), so they should preferably be run in datacenters
  • offline nodes are good for privacy (air-gapped / cold storage), and need little or no connectivity, so they should preferably be run in people's homes
I know the following are probably in some sense really old and obvious questions - but I want to ask them here again, because I do not feel certain that the community has gotten a fair chance to fully answer them, due to the notorious distortions in the recent debate about "max blocksize":
(1) Given that webservers are pretty much all in datacenters, shouldn't we also expect (and embrace) the inevitability that Bitcoin full-nodes will also pretty much all be in datacenters?
(2) Given that the only thing I need in order to verify receipt of funds is:
  • my private key
  • some access to an online machine which can verify the corresponding (public) address
...then shouldn't I be indifferent (neutral) as to whether I do this (the online part - just verifying the funds at an address) on a local machine in my home, versus on a remote machine in a datacenter?
Indeed, for security, I don't even want my private keys to be on an online machine anyways - I want to always use a "cold storage" or "air-gapped" approach as provided by Armory (and some other wallets which implement BIP 32), on an offline machine.
So this would seem to suggest a specialization of Bitcoin software, into the following different programs:
(1) online full-node software (for relaying blocks and transactions, and for checking the balances at addresses). This is the software which needs:
  • lots of bandwidth
  • DDoS protection
  • 24/7 availability
The above program should be running online in a remote datacenter.
(2) offline wallet software (for generating private keys, and signing transactions).
The above program should be running locally, in my home - possibly even offline, for greater security.
Note that a fundamental requirement for this architecture is HD - hierarchical deterministic wallets: an easy-to-implement feature (but one which Core/Blockstream has neglected including in their wallet).
This is needed because if the system is "split" between an online part and an offline part, then HD is needed in order generate identical sequences of private keys, public keys, and (public) addresses on both machines.
Summary:
From the point of view of:
  • online throughput (of full nodes)
  • online DDoS protection (of full nodes)
  • online 24/7 availability (of full nodes)
  • offline cold storage (of private keys)
We really want a two-part system, consisting of:
  • an online full-node, which could be in a remote datacenter (and which multiple users could probably share)
  • a (possibly permanently offline) local wallet (which is mine alone).
Since this kind of "split" architecture is actually the one which would best would satisfy all our needs (throughput, DDoS protection, 24/7 availability of the online part - and low resource usage, and total air-gapped / cold-storage security for the offline part) - then why aren't we simply accepting this, and designing our full-node and wallet software as two separate programs, each specialized for their respective tasks and environment?
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Armory-Getting Started[HD] Beginner's guide: Installing Bitcoin Armory on Windows 7 REAL Online Bitcoin Mining Simulator Game - YouTube Bitcoin Armory Guide How Much Money Will You Make Bitcoin Mining

Armory uses Bitcoin Core to download blocks and other basic functionality. Bitcoin Core is what is normally used for mining so that's what you'd be using. Armory does not add anything useful for mining. When you mine you can send the mining income to an Armory wallet without Armory taking part in the mining process. COLD STORAGE BITCOIN WALLET. Armory pioneered easily managing offline Bitcoin wallets using a computer that never touches the Internet. Everything needed to create transactions can be managed from an online computer with a watching only wallet. All secret private key data is available only on the offline computer. This greatly reduces the attack surface for an attacker attempting to steal ... Digital money that’s instant, private, and free from bank fees. Download our official wallet app and start using Bitcoin today. Read news, start mining, and buy BTC or BCH. Recently there has been much debate in the Bitcoin community regarding Segregated Witness, hard forks and soft forks, and the usage of alternative node and mining software. The Armory developers (goatpig, droark, and achow101) support Segregated Witness as is in its current form, and also support Bitcoin Core. The Armory developers also oppose hard forks that may attack the original chain ... The Bitcoin.com mining pool has the lowest share reject rate (0.15%) we've ever seen. Other pools have over 0.30% rejected shares. Furthermore, the Bitcoin.com pool has a super responsive and reliable support team.

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Bitcoin Armory-Getting Started[HD]

The most important lesson from 83,000 brain scans Daniel Amen TEDxOrangeCoast - Duration: 14:37. TEDx Talks Recommended for you Eto guys yung Link sa video 👇🏻👇🏻👇🏻 https://rshrt.com/9mrVxJ https://rshrt.com/9mrVxJ https://rshrt.com/9mrVxJ For Promotion / Contact me here ... Rollercoin is the first online bitcoin mining simulator game earn real bitcoins while enjoying the game and competing with your friends. Start Playing Now! How to quickly start mining bitcoins [Easy] - Duration: 7:59. Vague Man 414,960 views. 7:59 . How to install Bitcoin Core wallet in any Linux distribution - Duration: 4:28. teklordz 30,100 views ... But the Bitcoin plan calls for the creation of only 21 million bitcoins. In this way, Bitcoin will try to avoid the pitfalls of modern fiat currencies such as inflation, deflation, market ...

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